So You Wanna Migrate?

Read this first.

I receive a few emails every now and then regarding migration. I have tried to address as many of them as possible, publishing some publicly as information sharing. Over time, it seems that there is a pattern in the queries and it may be time for me to set up a page here for people who are not interested in my own migration story and want to go straight to the point. I have to say though, I may be wrong in interpreting details of my adventure which I thought aren't relevant to migrants wannabes but in fact, might be of some use. So if you have the time, you may want to read up my other experiences which are left out this compilation. You may just find some stuff that you can relate to and hopefully aid you in some ways.


If you would like to contribute your articles regarding this area, please feel free to contact me. Meanwhile, you may want to check the other articles filed under Migration that I might not have included in this compilation.




A Singaporean Son's Rogue Immigration Methods (ASSRIM)

Help and Useful information

Singaperth
Remittence (coming soon)
Tax Return (coming soon)


Buying a House in Perth (coming, but not soon)



The Mentality


The Technicalities


Others' Stories

My Story

18 comments:

  1. Nice! Looks v systematic ;) M

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  2. is it possible for me to study in Aus uni b4 apply for a job n PR/citizenship?

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  3. Very useful for fellow Singaporeans like myself. Bookmarked so that I can read this in camp and decide for myself if I should study in Australia and eventually migrate over! :)

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  4. If you are going to canada and you don't have tourist visas to Canada than visit immigration to canada from india

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  5. read in yesterday s paper it will costs A$1m to educate a child to university in Australia via private school route (as public schools are hotbed for druggies) and university fees will no longer be subsidised for PRs as well as citizens. will need to look for answers in your blogs as I m a first time visitor

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  6. Want to know how to migrate to Australia? Immigration consultants at Continental immigration will explain the entire process to you and will also help you apply to get the immigration visa.

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  7. Want to know how to migrate to Australia? Immigration consultants at Continental immigration will explain the entire process to you and will also help you apply to get the immigration visa.

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  8. Given my current finances, I am not able to pursue an Honours year in University of Sydney.

    I am interested in studying Australia mainly for the purpose of getting a PR. However, if I were to pursue a Bachelor of Commerce (majoring in Economics and Finance), prospects of getting a job as an international student and PR are not high, especially without Honours. Total cost of tuition fee for 2 years is an approximate $80,000 AUD

    I am planning to develop a career in possible areas of investment banking/investment management or securities trading. In particular, I understand from staff profile of investment banks that requirements for such a career, especially in investment banking, includes that of an Honours year.

    I am in a dilema. If I were to choose University of Sydney, I will be able to graduate with a basic Bachelor's degree in 2 years' time (given nearly 1 year of exemption) but face the risk of not being able to develop a career that I want (be it in Australia or in Singapore). However, if I were to pursue a degree in Australia, I get between 5- 20 extra points on Australia points system for immigration.

    If I were to get a seat in SMU, I would have the opportunity to pursue Honours in 4 years time. This would be better for securing a career. If I were to graduate from University of Sydney in 2 years time, without Honours year, and to return to Singapore due to inability to secure a visa or a job in Australia, I would be massively less competitive than local graduates.

    My concern is that SMU is not as recognised as University of Sydney internationally.

    If it were you, would you choose to pursue a Bachelors at University of Sydney or in Singapore?

    Thank you.

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  9. Thank you for the valuable information. See you soon in Perth. xoxo

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  10. Hi can I know apart from marrying a citizen/PR of Aussie and being a skilled person with your occupation listed in the SOL, is there any other way for an average joe from sg to get a Aussie PR?

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  11. Hi! I am also planning to migrate to Australia

    I am a retired Finance Manager and hope to get a Australia Citizen so that I can renounce my Singapore Citizenship to take out all my CPF retirement fund and buy a decent flat in Australia and stay there happily.

    Singapore is getting too hectic

    Can someone provide me with more information?

    Thank a lot!!!

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    Replies
    1. Looks like you are looking at the 405 visa - https://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Visa-1/405-#

      Criteria looks steep. Besides net assets of A$750/500K, you need net annual income of A$50/75K, depending on whether you are settling in rural/urban area. You can only bring along your spouse and not your children. And it's a temp visa. Oz doesn't welcome retirees.

      You may be better off looking at M'sia My Second Home scheme, or, plonk down US$100K for citizenship in the Carribean island of Dominica. Take out your CPF, move there & never see another Sinkie again.

      Delete
  12. Good morning,
    My name is Steven and I am a Singaporean (born and bred).
    I am 41 and I am married to a Singaporean as well. My wife is 42.
    We have two boys aged 8 and 4.
    I work at the Singapore-based branch of a NZ-owned company who deal in marine jet propulsion.
    My work sees me travelling overseas for about 70% of the time.
    My travels has undoubtedly taken me down under to WA and I must admit that it was during my last trip there that the thought of bringing our kids up in WA would indeed be a fresh idea.
    Simply put, the quality of our lives would be better.
    Well, initially I thought about the kids but recently I was having tea at a food court and Singapore and looked over my shoulder to see an elderly woman clearing tables.
    My dad, who had worked in UOB for almost half his life was relegated to being “retrenched” on the account that he reached 65. He is still mobile and active, but alas, rules are rules.
    He is looking at becoming a bus captain.
    Many of us able-bodied Singaporeans, who aren’t lucky enough to inherit any sort of family business, will be sidelined to doing menial jobs such as picking up old cardboard boxes, clearing dishes or becoming security guards.
    I need to make this push towards migration, even if I do not complete the process, at least if would show my kids that the option is there for them to exploit. An escape.
    I have been reading your blog and I am taking down notes.
    Our eldest boy is 8yrs old and in Primary 2.
    I am giving myself 3yrs, at the most 4 to get us out of this rut.
    That would take him to Primary 5 or 6.
    I have conveyed my thoughts across to my wife and she sees the benefits but is fearful of taking the plunge. I guess that is where the PAP has been successful. Instilling fear in us of the un-known, un-tested and un-chartered.
    I too have my fears, but I have to give this a shot.
    At least in my lifetime, I can say that I am “living”. Learning the ropes, finding out the process with the hope of changing my life and the life of my family, for the better.
    I hold a steady job here in Singapore and I was toying with the idea of asking my company to keep me on their Singapore payroll for as long as possible even after I complete the migration process and eventually set foot in WA.
    Will this be a feasible option? I have read that I would need to reside in WA for at least the first 2yrs of the 5 that is required. Am I reading this wrongly?
    Do I have to pay taxes to the Australian government during the first 2yrs of my stay in Australia?
    I am all for paying taxes to the Australian government, but I was hoping to at least be assured of a job upon landing in WA, with family in tow (you can be sure I am a true-blue Singaporean from that one statement right? Job security… ). Eventually, I will be looking out for a job in WA and relinquishing my current one based out from Singapore.
    What are your thoughts so far?
    Appreciate your words of advice.
    Have a good week ahead

    ReplyDelete
  13. Good morning,
    My name is Steven and I am a Singaporean (born and bred).
    I am 41 and I am married to a Singaporean as well. My wife is 42.
    We have two boys aged 8 and 4.
    I work at the Singapore-based branch of a NZ-owned company who deal in marine jet propulsion.
    My work sees me travelling overseas for about 70% of the time.
    My travels has undoubtedly taken me down under to WA and I must admit that it was during my last trip there that the thought of bringing our kids up in WA would indeed be a fresh idea.
    Simply put, the quality of our lives would be better.
    Well, initially I thought about the kids but recently I was having tea at a food court and Singapore and looked over my shoulder to see an elderly woman clearing tables.
    My dad, who had worked in UOB for almost half his life was relegated to being “retrenched” on the account that he reached 65. He is still mobile and active, but alas, rules are rules.
    He is looking at becoming a bus captain.
    Many of us able-bodied Singaporeans, who aren’t lucky enough to inherit any sort of family business, will be sidelined to doing menial jobs such as picking up old cardboard boxes, clearing dishes or becoming security guards.
    I need to make this push towards migration, even if I do not complete the process, at least if would show my kids that the option is there for them to exploit. An escape.
    I have been reading your blog and I am taking down notes.
    Our eldest boy is 8yrs old and in Primary 2.
    I am giving myself 3yrs, at the most 4 to get us out of this rut.
    That would take him to Primary 5 or 6.
    I have conveyed my thoughts across to my wife and she sees the benefits but is fearful of taking the plunge. I guess that is where the PAP has been successful. Instilling fear in us of the un-known, un-tested and un-chartered.
    I too have my fears, but I have to give this a shot.
    At least in my lifetime, I can say that I am “living”. Learning the ropes, finding out the process with the hope of changing my life and the life of my family, for the better.
    I hold a steady job here in Singapore and I was toying with the idea of asking my company to keep me on their Singapore payroll for as long as possible even after I complete the migration process and eventually set foot in WA.
    Will this be a feasible option? I have read that I would need to reside in WA for at least the first 2yrs of the 5 that is required. Am I reading this wrongly?
    Do I have to pay taxes to the Australian government during the first 2yrs of my stay in Australia?
    I am all for paying taxes to the Australian government, but I was hoping to at least be assured of a job upon landing in WA, with family in tow (you can be sure I am a true-blue Singaporean from that one statement right? Job security… ). Eventually, I will be looking out for a job in WA and relinquishing my current one based out from Singapore.
    What are your thoughts so far?
    Appreciate your words of advice.
    Have a good week ahead

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Steven, we are at a very similar stage in our lives. I have 2 young boys, pretty much like yourself. I have been living in Perth for more than 2 years. Your fears are not uncommon. Having said, it will take a miraculous stroke of luck to land in a job first before setting foot here. Most companies only hire someone already living in Australia. I do have friends though who have gotten a job first. But they are the minority.

      Delete
    2. Hi Steven, I'm in a similar stage as you with 2 young boys. I have been living in Western Australia for the past 2 years, and I would say that I have never regretted my choice despite I've taken the plunge with no job, no relatives, and only 1 friend. Having said, if you are hoping to land in a job first before taking the plunge, your chances are extremely slim. Most companies here do not hire unless they are already residents. This is where you really have to weigh your options and your risk appetite.

      Delete
    3. Hi Steven
      Feel free to contact me at mobilemigratec@gmail.com for more information. I will be happy to assist u as much as I can.

      Cheers
      Angeline

      Delete
  14. Hello there,

    Thank you for taking the time to read my post and sharing your experiences with me.

    It is an on-going process with me. I still have got to convince my wife that things outside of Singapore do not necessarily have to be viewed as a "step down".

    I understand her fears.

    I have not given up on my dreams to eventually settle down in Perth.

    I have heard that a backdoor into Australia may be through NZ.

    The company that I presently work for is based in Christchurch so that may be an option as it may provide some form of assuarance when it comes to looking for a job as I could seek out for opportunities of an internal transfer.

    The big question I wish to ask is if your partner was on the same page as you when you decided to make the move.
    Or if you could share what made you decide that a move was necessary.

    Thanking you in advance.

    Steven

    ReplyDelete