Enquiry on Migration (and future emails reply)

Many of you who come into contact with me may find me so. I admit I am weird, by Singapore societal standards. I disappear for long periods without replies, hide myself in a room occasionally and give curt responses when I finally do. Even my wife probably cannot stand me so I don't blame you if you find me rude, though it is not my intention to be. Anyway, if you wonder what happened to the emails you send me, they do get replied. Sometimes within seconds, sometimes for months. I don't know. I guess it depends on what was being asked. If I have the answers, I can probably reply right away. Inserting your beautiful pic will certainly help accelerate the process of course, if you are chio bu.


Anyway, I've created a section at the bottom right hand corner of the page.




So if you have nothing better to do, you can read those in your free time. For longer emails, I guess it is too heavy to include in that narrow columns, so I may reply them in a post like I previously so. Such as one of these....






Hi A Singaporean Son


I have been reading your blog posts on migrating to Australia with interest, as I have found your sharing of insights and experience helpful and inspiring.
By way of introduction, I am a Singaporean working as an editor and planning to relocate to Australia with my wife. I hope to do so within a year or so, as my age is 43 years this year (incidentally, today is the last day of 2016). I have come to realise that Singapore has become a rather inimical place for me to continue staying in, as the environment and people aren’t conducive for me to grow and prosper as a human being ought to. I have been thinking to myself that though I may be born in Singapore, I don’t necessarily "belong" to this place as I am a citizen of the cosmos, and I don’t subscribe to their idea of nationalism or tribalism.

Having been to Australia a couple of times (Melbourne in 1995, and Brisbane and Sydney in 2001) and having done some research, I believe Australia offers more opportunities for personal growth, career development (in the sense of doing what I really like and enjoy and find fulfilling), and better work-balance, and the cooler climate and spacious natural environment are a plus point as well.
I have been speaking with a few migration consultants so far, and I learnt that the most plausible pathway for me and my wife to obtain PR in Australia is to apply for the skilled nominated visa 190, and the only state at the moment that can sponsor this visa for the occupation of (Book) Editor is South Australia. Another possible pathway is getting sponsored by an Australian employer. I am still in the process of researching how best to get started on either or both possible pathways.
I learnt from your comment in your blog post http://asingaporeanson.blogspot.sg/2012/02/how-to-apply-for-australian-permanent.html that James A Hall of ANZ Migration was your agent and he rejected your application, and he told you how you could get qualified. If I understand from your blog posts correctly (as I have read a few of them randomly and I may not get the full picture or most accurate picture at the moment), you have chosen to apply for your PR visa from the Australian immigration department directly and you succeeded in getting your visa in this manner, is that right?
If so, I would like to hear about your experiences regarding how you have managed to get qualified for the PR visa after having gotten your application rejected by the migrant consultant, and whether you have any tips or advice for me because I am considering applying for the PR or skilled nominated visa or equivalent from the Australian immigration department directly as well. This will help save money for the entire migration process as I understand that agency fees usually cost thousands of dollars, and I understand there will be fixed costs with regard to paying for the English Language test (to the test provider), the skilled assessment and the visa application (to the Australian authorities), as well as the medical examination and police checks.


Thank you for having read this thus far, and I look forward to hearing from you.
Regards


Dear Jimmy,

By way of introduction, I am a Singaporean working as an editor and planning to relocate to Australia with my wife. I hope to do so within a year or so, as my age is 43 years this year (incidentally, today is the last day of 2016). I have come to realise that Singapore has become a rather inimical place for me to continue staying in, as the environment and people aren’t conducive for me to grow and prosper as a human being ought to. I have been thinking to myself that though I may be born in Singapore, I don’t necessarily "belong" to this place as I am a citizen of the cosmos, and I don’t subscribe to their idea of nationalism or tribalism.\

I really like the way you describe the situation, for it reminded me of how I felt in 2008 and with my limited literacy level, couldn't have describe it better than your good self. The only problem is, why did you take that long to realise it, assuming your non-subscription of their brand of nationalism isn't a recently adopted one.


Perhaps it wasn't appropriate for me to term that as a problem. I believe the realisation of where Singapore is heading to and predicting our position in it in the future is a good thing. It forces us to start thinking if there is anything better we can do for ourselves. If you or your wife can still get your Aust PR via the migration agent's help, don't delay much longer.


I wasn't qualified to come to Australia via skilled migration at the time of assessment. Mr James Hall told me if I could switch to the construction industry and chalk up 1-2 years of working experience, he should be able to qualify me with my Diploma, instead of using my IS Degree which I am short of 4 years of working experience in various job roles I tried but couldn't land one to start off with. Thus, I switched to the construction industry. Later on, I was too impatient and applied for a Spouse Visa instead, tagging on to my wife who gotten her PR before we got married.


Doing the application ourselves instead of going through the migration agent is a separate issue. The sole reason of doing that was to save (heaps of) cost. On the flip side, the risks to get it wrong are higher and being meticulous is required.


Hope I cleared all your questions.

1 comment:

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